The Artists: Saarbrücken

Akosua Viktoria Adu-Sanyah

Akosua Viktoria Adu-Sanyah, born in Bonn in 1990, lives and works in Zurich. She studied at the Hochschule der Bildenden Künste Saar from 2009 to 2015. Her artistic practice is characterised by the physical handling of analogue photographic processes whose subjects question concepts of identity  and break with categories. Representative for her work is a modern interweaving with cultural research and journalistic methods.

Natalie Brück

The spoken pieces, videos and performances by Natalie Brück (*1989 in Saarlouis) draw her audience into a maelstrom in which the artist verbalises and visualises her own observations and surreal memories, sometimes stoically, sometimes rhythmically. The emerging and receding trains of thought are staged in a poetic or even disturbing way through the concise use of her voice. In her performances, too, she deliberately creates empty spaces to make ideas and possibilities visible and to put the focus on everything that is happening between people.

Florian Huth

Florian Huth (*1980 in Saarbrücken) completed his fine arts studies as a master student of Olaf Metzel at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich in 2019. In his works, he repeats, alienates and questions art with various witty, ingenious and irreverent means. He often reinterprets and thwarts works and idols from art history. His works can usually be seen as art about art, in which the most diverse media such as photography, sculpture, drawing and printmaking take on conceptual significance.

Fritz Laszlo Weber

Fritz Laszlo Weber (*1990 in Saarbrücken) is present in interdisciplinary ways with his own and collective projects in art, film and other cultural contexts. He studied visual communication at the Kunsthochschule Kassel and then went on to study for a master's degree at the Hochschule für Künste Bremen. The projects and works in which Fritz Laszlo Weber is involved are an attempt to formulate a possible response to concrete places and our involvement with them. In doing so, the social, material and technological conditions of these places are often the starting point of a narrative that asks for other possible ways of coexistence in these places.